Wednesday, 31 December 2014

My First Flash Game - "My Dinner With Jonathan"

Part of the game design course I'm enrolled on is learning how to make games using Flash, so earlier this month, I made a short game to practice coding (basic stuff like changing frames and triggering animations). As I mentioned in my last blog post, over the past couple of months, Jonathan McIntosh -- producer of the Feminist Frequency Tropes vs Women in Video Games series -- has been getting a lot more attention on Twitter for his often bizarre statements. That led to the "#FullMcIntosh" hashtag being used to describe some of his most ridiculous tweets. He's gradually stopped being a behind-the-scenes figure and has become more prominent, to the point of appearing in a Feminist Frequency video himself.

So naturally, I decided that my game should parody Jonathan McIntosh.



I explain a lot about the reasons behind the game on the "About" screen but basically, my criticism of the Tropes vs Women series has been ignored. Everyone's criticism of the TvsW series has been ignored, unless it's very easy to dismiss (as was the case with Doug Walker in August 2013). Yet the views of McIntosh and Sarkeesian, as flawed, unproven and blatantly untrue as they are, still receive recognition in game journalism circles. With that in mind, I've joined everyone else who's said "screw it" and decided that parody is a far better way of raising an objection than scrutinising every line of a Tropes vs Woman video.

I actually put more of an effort into it than you might think; I trawled McIntosh's timeline and the #FullMcIntosh hashtag for some of the most ridiculous things he's written and many of them were so ludicrous that I could put them into the game unaltered. Others were exaggerated slightly and a few were entirely fabricated (which meant I had to think like McIntosh. It was arduous). I made a list of actual Jonathan McIntosh statements and highlighted the ones that ended up in the game in some form or another:

Left-click for larger view.
Bear in mind that this is my first Flash game ever, so I'm pretty happy with how it turned out overall. As you can probably tell, I'm not much of an artist but coding-wise, I learned plenty from it.

However, if you want a far more fun parody, about a week after I posted my game on Twitter, someone posted a link to a game called "Vivtest - Xmas Edition". If you're familiar with #GamerGate, it features a lot of references to figures who are, apparently, opposed to more ethical behaviour from game journalists. And yes, Jonathan McIntosh makes an appearance as well.

Happy New Year!

11 comments:

  1. Good post! I'll be checking these out when I get home from work tonight.

    The funny think about #FullMcIntosh is the fact that it's so damn hard to discern the fact he isn't his own parody account- and actually says those things!

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    1. That's right. For a long time, I remember there was a parody account called "radica1bytes", with a number "1" instead of a small "L". That threw everyone off for a while but it was also hilarious. :)

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  2. We call him Josh now. Can you add a Josh option?

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    1. Heh. My answer to that is "yes but I'm too lazy".

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  3. Well done on your game, it provided a good way to laugh at McIntosh's expense, it was very well made too, by the way.

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    1. Thanks a lot. :) I'm certainly pleased with it.

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    1. At the time, I didn't know how to add music. I do now but I'm not going to put it in.

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  5. Sorry to be out of topic, but I saw your tweets on the Charlie Hebdo attack and I'm strongly disagree with you.

    First one of the two cops killed was Muslim: http://dailycaller.com/2015/01/07/ahmed-merabet-cop-killed-in-paris-attacks-was-muslim/

    The Muslims represents 5 to 10 percent of French population, it's one of the biggest community in Europe. About the fact religious symbol and face covering are banned in schools, it's because in France we believe school should be free to any religious influences and accessible to anyone. I work in a high school I don't know who is Muslims or Christians and I don't care. I see the students as individuals with their own personal struggles and not the community they belong. If you think it's a problem that's your opinion and I respect it.

    About Charlie Hebdo, you're right they are not heroes no they are satirists. Their goal denounced the stupidity and ignorance with humour. They paid the prices with their lives but till the end they stay truth to their convictions

    If you want to know the real reasons behind the attacks: http://www.juancole.com/2015/01/sharpening-contradictions-satirists.html

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    1. Thank you for being respectful while stating your opinion but I'm unconvinced. What you describe as being "free" of any religious influences is restricting their ability to express themselves. I can understand wanting schools wanting their teachers and classes to be secular but not to the point that students are being told they can't express their religion freely. As for face coverings, I find it worrying that there still laws telling women (and men, actually) what they can and can't wear when it's the same thing that is frequently criticised about Islam.

      I know the Charlie Hebdo attacks were unrelated to that but it's something I wanted to express after seeing a lot of anti-Muslim sentiment and people expressing the satirists' right to express themselves in a way that I haven't heard concerning religious people.

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  6. The reason behind the ban in school, it's because students refused to removed their veil during PE or sports, arguing their religions forbid them. This situation created a conflicts between religion practises which are private and the public education. The government consolidate the secularism in school with the law.

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